Info

Light has always been an essential element in my work. While initially I used light as a tool mainly to represent movement, over the years my focus has shifted towards exposing the particular energy of the phenomenon itself.
Most of my works are created for public space. My aim is always to disclose the processes and informative aspects at work within a specific environment. Light, be it LED's, bulbs, neon or daylight, has proved to be the most suitable material for me to do so.
Working with light has thus evolved into an ongoing research into its visual possibilities as well as its inherent significance. In the work Possibility Plant drops of light fall from a steel cylinder plant unto the garage floor, as glimpses of a hidden process. In the work Sjamaan (Shaman), made for the machine hall of DordtYart, daylight is captured in coloured blocks of solid glass. The glass' presence changes with the light travelling through the scene, highlighting the spaciousness of the hall as a result.

Thus, the starting point of a work for me is usually a given location, and I seek to give rise to a ‘view’ that makes particular aspects or elements of this environment visible; aspects or elements which would otherwise go unnoticed. At the same time, the work also always tells its own story. It is not an illustration of the place it inhabits, but rather tries to expand the experience of that place: a new situation arises, without the existing one being obscured. The work is never dominant, it is a proposition: to see things in a new light.

On Lokroep

“The most powerful are the crazy cries and the more romantic words, thanks to their sharp contrasts with the functional environment. Vos has used only the basic techniques of illuminated advertising. No colours, no frills, no expensive materials. She has elevated the key qualities of this area – simplicity, functionality, format – to a higher level, by translating these into glamour, into art.”

Sandra Smets, Dagdroom in niemandsland [Daydream in no man’s land], NRC Handelsblad, 2 June 2006